SFTPPlus Documentation

Start Page 6. Client-side Usage Instructions 6.2. Command-Line Client-Shell

6.2. Command-Line Client-Shell

6.2.1. Introduction

A command-line shell is provided to access remote file transfer servers using an interactive interface.

On Unix and Linux systems, the client-shell is available as:

$ ./bin/client-shell.sh

On Windows systems, the client-shell is available as:

CMD> client-shell.bat

All Unix/Linux and Windows versions provide the same command-line arguments and shell commands. We use the generic client-shell name for both types of executable files.

All commands to be executed in the client’s shell are prefixed with:

>

The focus of our product is on providing tools for non-interactive file transfers. The client-shell is provided as a tool to help with troubleshooting or administrative tasks, without requiring an external tool.

In the case that you are using or planning to use the client-shell for production, your feedback and comments are welcome. They help us improve the client-shell and extend the scope of its usage.

If you need an interactive file transfer client with a graphical user interface, we suggest trying a better suited FTP/FTPS/SFTP/SCP client such as FileZilla, WinSCP or Cyberduck.

6.2.2. Command-line arguments and shell options

The configuration options required to connect to a remote server (IP, port, username, password, etc.) are available in the shell as options and on the command-line as arguments.

To open a connection for user john outside the client-shell:

client-shell --username john

To show all available command-line arguments outside the client-shell:

client-shell --help

To set the username as john inside the client-shell:

> set username john

To show all available options inside the client-shell:

> show

6.2.3. Shell operation

When the client-shell is started, you will see a prompt such as:

SFTPPlus (3.0.0) file transfer client shell
>

After that, you can start entering client-shell commands. To show all available commands, use:

> help

To find more details about a command, use:

> help COMAND_NAME

For example, to show more details about the command open, use:

> help open

Command names are case-insensitive. You can abbreviate the command names, as long as the abbreviation does not conflict with another command name. Shell options are case-sensitive.

For example, the following inputs will trigger the same command, namely connect:

> connect
> CONNECT
> Connect
> con

When an abbreviation matches multiple commands, you will get an error:

> c
Abbreviation has multiple commands: close connect

Connections to remote servers are started using the open command and closed using the close command. After a connection is made, the shell can be used to issue file transfer commands, such as mkdir, rmdir, rm, mv, put, get, etc.

Let’s exemplify a connection to a SFTP server using connection options specified as command-line arguments. The following will open the connection, list the content of a folder, close the connection, and then exit the client-shell:

client-shell sftp://john@sftp-acct1.example.com:10022 \
--ssh-server-fingerprint=06:cb:46:2b:9a:9a:c4:10:54:f0:ea:2f:b6:05:cb:a0 \
--ssh-private-key=test_data/ssh/test-ssh-rsa-1024
> open
> ls
> close
> exit

The next example shows the same connection, with connection options specified using shell options:

client-shell
> set protocol sftp
> set address sftp-acct1.example.com
> set port 10022
> set username john
> set ssh_private_key test_data/ssh/test-ssh-rsa-1024
> set ssh_server_fingerprint 06:cb:46:2b:9a:9a:c4:10:54:f0:ea:2f:b6:05:cb
> open
> ls
> close
> exit

6.2.4. File paths with spaces

To handle paths with spaces, quote them using single quotes (). Double quotes (‘’) and backslash escaping (like some\\ space) are not supported.

Below is an example for moving a file between paths with spaces:

client-shell
> # Don't forget to set connection options.
> open
> mv 'source dir/source file' 'destination dir/target file'
> close
> exit

6.2.5. File upload / download operations

The client-shell provides the equivalent put / upload commands for uploading a file and the corresponding get / download commands for downloading a file:

client-shell
> set protocol sftp
> set address sftp-acct1.example.com
> set port 10022
> set username john
> set password pass-for-johnny
> set ssh_server_fingerprint 06:cb:46:2b:9a:9a:c4:10:54:f0:ea:2f:b6:05:cb
> open
>
> # Uploading a local file with a new name on the remote destination.
> put path/to/local.file destination/remote.file
> # Uploading a local file with the same name on the remote destination.
> upload path/to/local.file
>
> # Downloading a remote file with a new name on the local destination.
> get path/to/remote.file destination/local.file
> # Downloading a remote file with the same name on the local destination.
> download path/to/remote.file
> close
> exit

6.2.6. Connecting to multiple servers

During a client-shell session, you can issue commands to connect to more than one server. But only a single connection is active at one time. Opening a new connection will automatically close a previous connection.

The next example shows a single shell session inside which two connections are made to different servers:

client-shell
> set protocol sftp
> set address sftp-acct1.example.com
> set port 10022
> set username john
> set ssh_private_key test_data/ssh/test-ssh-rsa-1024
> set ssh_server_fingerprint 06:cb:46:2b:9a:9a:c4:10:54:f0:ea:2f:b6:05:cb
> open
> ls
> close
> set protocol sftp
> set address sftp-vendors2.example.com
> set port 22
> set username actpd
> set password sd!ds21p
> open
> ls
> close

6.2.7. Batch mode

The client-shell can read commands and options from a plain text file. We call this a batch file.

Each command in a batch file should be put on a separate line. Lines starting with # are considered comments and ignored. Empty lines are also ignored.

After processing the last line, the client-shell will exit.

Here is an example of a batch file to connect to a remote server and list the content of its root directory:

# Server for accounting. This is a comment.
set protocol sftp
set address sftp-acct1.example.com
set port 10022
set username john
set ssh_private_key test_data/ssh/test-ssh-rsa-1024
set ssh_server_fingerprint 06:cb:46:2b:9a:9a:c4:10:54:f0:ea:2f:b6:05:cb

open
# List root directory. A comment which is ignored.
ls
close

To run the client-shell in batch mode, use:

client-shell --batch path/to/batch/file

6.2.8. Reading client-side events

The SFTPPlus client-side implementation will emit all events relating to the client-side activity. The events can be used for logging or for hooks in other managed file transfer workflows.

See below for client-side events relating to a file that does not exist:

| > get file_does_not_exist.pdf
  60053 2017-08-14 14:06:43 Process Process 0.0.0.0:0 Successfully opened
  "file_does_not_exist.pdf" for reading on "ftp".
| 60036 2017-08-14 14:06:43 Process Process 0.0.0.0:0 Failed to close
  "file_does_not_exist.pdf" on location "ftp". Was opened for reading.
  ['550 File not found']

See below for the corresponding server-side events from a third-party server:

| (000020)8/14/2017 14:06:43 PM - support_team (127.0.0.1)>
  RETR file_does_not_exist.pdf
| (000020)8/14/2017 14:06:43 PM - support_team (127.0.0.1)>
  550 File not found

6.2.9. Azure Files and other cloud storage services

The Azure Files cloud storage service is accessed over HTTPS using the fixed port 443 and an address automatically generated based on the account name.

Below is an example of connecting the storage account named stciv1 using a password which is securely entered at runtime:

$ ./bin/client-shell.sh azure-file://stciv1@address-ignored -p

Password: ENTER YOUR PASSWORD HERE

SFTPPlus (3.47.0) file transfer client shell
> connect